Again, Never Again

Bangkok is my city, currently. It’s second home and working base. I’ve concealed ‘love or hate’ towards it. Whatever it is, doesn’t affect my physical presence yet. The latest but unprecedented deadly blast at Erawan Shrine in Ratchaprasong on August 17 however has shaken many of us, Bangkokians who have got accustomed to bomb and grenade to some extent. This time, bomber(s) has aimed mass casualty, regardless who there were. The obvious will to kill or maim as many as possible was unprecedented. The issue of ‘religious symbol’ and location of luxury downtown aren’t really unprecedented. We have had army snipers who fired at Wat Pathumwanaram, some 500 meters to the west from Erawan Shrine, killing 6 Red Shirts protesters who took refugee inside the temple in 2010. Back then, the luxury district of Ratchaprasong had turned into partially a battle field and finally ended up in massacre of dozens of civilians who demanded not less than democratic election.

As for bombing at Erawan Shrine this time, ‘candidates’ of bombers are too varied, indicating almost clueless. It’s from anti-establishment Red Shirt via factions of Army and Southern insurgency to ISIS, and just added ‘Grey Wolves’ – the Turkish right wing organization having had violent history. The Junta, despite their increasing budget since the 2006 coup, have shamelessly proved (not ‘improved’) their poor intelligence making little progress of investigation since the blast. Royal Thai Police for their part have blamed poor equipment for poor progress of investigation. But not all that poor when it comes to bring a record. On August 23 police have launched a massive operation named ‘Lock Down the City’, which was supposed to aim to find out bombers but to bust 142 people on unrelated crimes instead. In the morning of the same day, police chief Somyot Pumpunmuang said “Bomber may have escaped the country” and “need some luck to make an arrest”. I seriously wish him Good Luck!

Here are some photos from Erawan Shrine and its neighborhood, including those who came to the Shrine praying for the victims. Rest In Peace.

All Rights Reserved © Lee Yu Kyung 2015

Erawan Shrine has been reopened on August 19, 2 days after bomb blast which killed more than 20. People including many tourists have come to shrine to pray respect for the victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine has been reopened on August 19, 2 days after deadly blast which killed more than 20 injuring more than 120, People including many tourists have come to shrine to pray for the victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

A foreigner pray at Erawan Shrine, where bomb was placed to blast on August 17 killing more than 20. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

A foreigner was praying at Erawan Shrine, where bomb was placed before deadly blast killing more than 20 and some 120 were injured on August 17. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Gi Gwo Lian (70) is Myanmar citizen of Chinese origin. She came to Bangkok on August 17, the day of deadly bomb blast. 2 days later as Erawan Shrine reopened, she came to pray for victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Gi Gwo Lian (70) is a Myanmar citizen of Chinese origin. She came to Bangkok on August 17, the day of deadly bomb blast. 2 days later as Erawan Shrine reopened, she came to pray for victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Brahma statue has been damaged in its chin despite the powerful bomb blast killing more than 20. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Brahma statue at the center of Erawan Shrine has been little damaged in its chin despite the powerful bomb blast killing more than 20. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Never mind the spelling. It certainly meant what it shou'd have. 'Rest In Peace' with flowers. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Never mind the spelling. It certainly meant what it should have. ‘Rest In Peace’. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Office workers during or after work came to the Shrine to pray (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Since early evening, office workers have started to come to the Shrine to pray.(© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine has been reopened on August 19, 2 days after bomb blast which killed more than 20. People including many tourists have come to shrine to pray respect for the victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine has been reopened on August 19, 2 days after bomb blast which killed more than 20 and injured some 120. People including many tourists have come to shrine to pray for the victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine has been reopened on August 19, 2 days after bomb blast which killed more than 20. People including many tourists have come to shrine to pray respect for the victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine has been reopened on August 19, 2 days after bomb blast which killed more than 20. People including many tourists have come to shrine to pray for the victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Light the incense for a begin for praying (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Light the incense for a begin for praying (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine has been reopened on August 19, 2 days after bomb blast which killed more than 20. People including many tourists have come to shrine to pray respect for the victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine has been reopened on August 19, 2 days after bomb blast which killed more than 20. People including many tourists have come to shrine to pray for the victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine has been reopened on August 19, 2 days after bomb blast which killed more than 20. Various walks of life including many tourists have come to shrine to pray for the victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine has been reopened on August 19, 2 days after bomb blast which killed more than 20. Various walks of life including many tourists have come to shrine to pray for the victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

An old lady was praying at Erawan Shrine in Bangkok, where deadly bomb blast took place on August 17. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

An old lady was praying at Erawan Shrine in Bangkok, where deadly bomb blast took place on August 17. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

A worker at Erawan Shrine has kept cleaning while prayers have come ongoing. Workers at the Shrine allegedly found remains of victims of the deadly bomb, which killed more than 20. There's criticism towards authority not to have thoroughly checked the scene to collect evidence. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

A worker at Erawan Shrine has kept cleaning while prayers have come ongoing. Workers at the Shrine allegedly found remains of victims of the deadly bomb, which killed more than 20 and injured 120. There’s criticism towards authority not to have thoroughly checked the scene to collect evidence. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine has been reopened on August 19, 2 days after bomb blast which killed more than 20. People including many tourists have come to shrine to pray respect for the victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine has been reopened on August 19, 2 days after bomb blast which killed more than 20. People including many tourists have come to shrine to pray respect for the victims. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Casualty board at Police Hospital, about 50 meters away from Erawan Shrine. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

‘Wait for more information’. Casualty board at Police Hospital, about 50 meters away from Erawan Shrine. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Rachaprasong, where Erawan Shrine is located, is a center point of Bangkok's downtown. Luxury hotels, shopping malls and offices are massed in the district. It's also the memorial place of political violence in recent decade. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Rachaprasong, where Erawan Shrine is located, is a center point of Bangkok’s downtown. Luxury hotels, shopping malls and offices are massed in the district. It’s also the memorial place of political violence in recent decade. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Since the deadly bomb blast on August 17, Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (or BMA) has set up help desk for tourists nearby (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Since the deadly bomb blast on August 17, Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (or BMA) has set up help desk for tourists nearby (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Since the deadly bomb blast on August 17, Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (or BMA) has set up help desk for tourists nearby having Chinese speaking officer (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Since the deadly bomb blast on August 17, Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (or BMA) has set up help desk for tourists nearby assigned Chinese speaking officer (© Lee Yu Kyung)

City police in Bangkok near the deadly blast scene. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

City police in Bangkok near the deadly blast scene. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Days after the deadly bomb blast in Bangkok, Siam area - near the blast scene - was almost emptied with shoppers or pedestrians. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Days after the deadly bomb blast in Bangkok, Siam area – next to the blast scene – was almost emptied with shoppers or pedestrians, otherwise the bustling street. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Wat Pathumwan, some 500 meters to the west from the deadly blast on August 17, is another sacred place where violence was not spared in May 2010. Army snipers then shot at Red Shirts protesters who took refugees in the temple, killing 6 of them. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Wat Pathumwanaram, some 500 meters to the west from the deadly blast scene on August 17, is another example that sacred place was not spared with attack. In May 19, 2010 Army snipers shot at Red Shirts protesters who took refugees inside the temple, killing 6 of them. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Praying continued for more days at Erawan Shrine, where the bomb was placed before deadly blast on August 17 in Bangkok. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Praying continued for more days at Erawan Shrine, where the bomb was placed before deadly blast on August 17 in Bangkok. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Praying continued for more days at Erawan Shrine, where the bomb was placed before deadly blast on August 17 in Bangkok. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Praying continued for more days at Erawan Shrine, where the bomb was placed before deadly blast on August 17 in Bangkok. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine in Bangkok. A suspect on CCTV has placed the bomb inside the shrine before he left and deadly blast on August 17. It has killed more than 20, many of whom were Asian tourists. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

Erawan Shrine in Bangkok. A suspect on CCTV has placed the bomb inside the shrine before he left. Deadly blast afterwards has killed more 20 on August 17. Many of victims were either Thai or Asian tourists. (© Lee Yu Kyung)

*Relevant articles here (short) and here (long). Both in Korean.

One response to “Again, Never Again

  1. Pingback: 해탈을 ‘파는’ 타이 불교, 정교분리원칙마저 위태하다 | Another WORD is Possible·

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